Loving your enemies: Lesson from Dr King

Love for our enemies may compel us to downplay their abuse, but love for the victims should compel us not to.

“Forgiveness does not mean ignoring what has been done or putting a false label on an evil act. It means, rather, that the evil act no longer remains as a barrier to the relationship.”

“We must recognize that the evil deed of the enemy-neighbor, the thing that hurts, never quite expresses all that he is. An element of goodness may be found even in our worst enemy.

Racists are nice people….

“Dr. E. Franklin Fraizer, in an interesting essay entitled ‘the Pathology of Race Prejudice,’ included several examples of white persons who were normal, amiable, and congenial in their day-to-day relationships with other white persons but when they were challenged to think of Negroes as equals or even to discuss the question of racial injustice, they reacted with unbelievable irrationality and an abnormal unbalance. This happens when hate lingers in our minds…”

I find the writings of Dr King useful in explaining how to love our enemy-neighbours (i.e. government supporters).

[Quotes from Dr Martin Luther King Jr., Strength to Love, Ch. 5: Loving your enemies]

They are enemies. (Eritrean president Issaias Afewerki and high-ranking officials)

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